Difference between revisions of "Diversity and Dissent in Education- Recording Sound for Video"

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* Get the microphone as close to the actor’s mouth as possible
 
* Get the microphone as close to the actor’s mouth as possible
 
* No mounted camera mics if at all possible
 
* No mounted camera mics if at all possible
* Good locations with on echo
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* Good locations with no echo
  
 
== LISTEN TO AUDIO WHILE YOU SHOOT ==
 
== LISTEN TO AUDIO WHILE YOU SHOOT ==
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=== BOOM TECHNIQUES ===
 
=== BOOM TECHNIQUES ===
Proper shock mounts must be used
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==== Proper shock mounts must be used ====
 
#Stabilizing mic holder
 
#Stabilizing mic holder
 
#Plastic blimp
 
#Plastic blimp
 
#Dead cat or windscreen
 
#Dead cat or windscreen
Placement
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==== Placement ====
 
# As close as possible (to achieve best signal-to-noise ratio)
 
# As close as possible (to achieve best signal-to-noise ratio)
 
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* Limiters can help you avoid clipping
 
* Limiters can help you avoid clipping
  
Headphone levels  
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==== Headphone levels ====
Leave level alone so you have a set reference point
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* Leave level alone so you have a set reference point
If you can leave multiple signals split into left and right in your headphones, this will give you better quality control for the signals  
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* If you can leave multiple signals split into left and right in your headphones, this will give you better quality control for the signals
 
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[[Category:2017-2018]]
 
[[Category:2017-2018]]

Latest revision as of 09:36, 6 February 2018

Recording Sound for Video

  • Recording great production sound—if you fail here, you will spend so much extra time in post-production for not as good results
  • Sound is often distant consideration to video, which is a mistake

Things to consider:

LOCATION

  • Conduct interviews in quiet rooms
  • Take sound, not just visuals, into account when doing location scouts

TREAT YOUR SPACE

  • Echo and reverb is nearly impossible to eliminate
  • Use area outside of the frame to put absorbing material up
  • Carpet will help cut down on reverb

SIGNAL—TO—NOISE RATIO

  • Good sound > Bad sound/Background noise
  • Just because it sounds good in the headphones, you want the distance between your good and bad audio levels to be large
  • Get the microphone as close to the actor’s mouth as possible
  • No mounted camera mics if at all possible
  • Good locations with no echo

LISTEN TO AUDIO WHILE YOU SHOOT

  • Closed-back headphones (blocks outside noise, no earbuds, Dr. Dre Beats, etc. as they change the audio mix)
  • Make crew aware of any problems
  • Do takes again, if needed
  • Record Wild Lines if necessary (audio take with same mics from scene that can be subbed into bad audio takes)

Audio Gear

HYPER-DIRECTIONAL MICROPHONE (BOOM MIC)

  • Supercardioid or hypercardioid polar pattern
  • Main source for sounds

WIRELESS LAVALIER

Coverage for when you don’t get the boom close enough

EXTERNAL RECORDING DEVICE

  • Olympus LS-100
  • Zoom H4 or H6

SOUND CLAPPER

  • A must have for dual sound recording

PROFESSIONAL HEADPHONES

  • You want closed back headphones that are objective—earbuds, Dr. Dre Beats, etc. hype sound

Recording Techniques

LAVALIER TECHNIQUES

  • Placement- in a documentary they are often visible, just above the chest
  • Very sensitive
  • Cable adds noise
  • Create one or two loops, then when the cable is pulled it won’t move the mic
  • Triangle of gaffer tape around mic and windscreen can cut down on noise
  • In work outside of documentary, get your lavalier as close to your source as possible while hidden
  • Also monitor lavalier recording to note any “radio hits”

BOOM TECHNIQUES

Proper shock mounts must be used

  1. Stabilizing mic holder
  2. Plastic blimp
  3. Dead cat or windscreen

Placement

  1. As close as possible (to achieve best signal-to-noise ratio)
  2. Just outside the frame
  3. Aim directly at subject’s mouth
  4. Polar pattern incredibly accurate, so be aware of rear mic sensitivity and when sound is reflecting in the space
  5. Sides of the mic are good at rejection
  6. Outside, put the back of the mic at sky
  7. Indoors are harder, ceilings are sound reflective
  8. Be consistent

LEVELS AND MONITORING

Record levels

  • Level headroom (more dynamic space to work with)
  • Lower levels are fine, if you have a good signal-to-noise ratio
  • -20…-12 is a good record area
  • Peaks can go as high as -3 and still be in a safe range
  • Limiters can help you avoid clipping

Headphone levels

  • Leave level alone so you have a set reference point
  • If you can leave multiple signals split into left and right in your headphones, this will give you better quality control for the signals